Social Science Update: Does a presumption of joint physical custody in the law make any difference in cases involving domestic abuse?

In 2011, social scientists looked at the effect of the 1997 change to Oregon’s custody law. The law changed to include the presumption that joint physical custody is in the best interests of the children of divorce. The study review 500 randomly selected files of cases involving children for three years before the change in the law and for five years after the change in the law.

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Social Science Update: What is effect of childhood stress on health across the lifespan?

In 2008, social scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a study that looked at the effects of positive stress, tolerable stress, and toxic stress on children. The study looked at 17,000 adults of which almost 2/3 reported one type of stress and more than 20% reported multiple types of stress.

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Social Science Update: Are mediation agreements an appropriate divorce tool in families with a history of intimate partner violence?

In 2012, social scientists did a study to examine mediated agreements in initial divorces, paternity cases, and post-divorce modifications. The study looked at intimate partner violence in the context of these mediated agreements.

 

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Social Science Update: How does intimate partner violence and other family violence affect children?

In 2011, social scientists did a study to examine children’s exposure to intimate partner violence and other family violence. The study focused on psychological violence between parents, including threats and displaced aggression such as punching a wall, and violence involving other family members, such as a parent or child hitting a child. The study looked at the past year and lifetimes of 4,500 children in four different age groups: 0-5, 6-9, 10-13, and 14-17.

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