Q: What are the requirements for a deviation in child support?

A: The stipulation must include written findings that state each parent’s gross income; each parent’s PIC’s (parental income); the amount of the child support obligation computed under the Minnesota Statutes; the reasons for the deviation and how the deviation serves the best interests of the child.

It is important to note that the deviation in child support must be approved by the court and the court may require a hearing.

An example of a “Child Support-Expense Sharing Agreement” can be found below for reference.

In light of the parties’ parenting schedule, which calls for a 50/50 time sharing arrangement, the incomes of the parents and the Minnesota guidelines, the parties have agreed not to exchange cash child support.

The parties shall use the joint Wells Fargo checking account #2247 to pay for the child’s ordinary and reasonable living expenses, including clothing, gifts, books/ subscriptions, life insurance, swimming, daycare, babysitting and child expenses. Each party shall contribute equally to the child’s expense account. The husband shall pay for minor child’s medical and dental insurance

This system has been working well for the parties and they believe continuing to use this system is in the child’s best interests as it enables the parties’ to easily cover the child’s expenses with little dispute.

Starting February 22, 2012, and on the 20th day of every month thereafter, each party shall contribute $788 to their joint Wells Fargo checking account. #2247 to be used to cover the following expenses for the child:

            Initial Child’s Budget                       Monthly Expense

            Clothing                                              $100

            Personal Care (haircuts)                     $10

            Books/subscriptions                            $10

            Life Insurance                                     $14

            Swimming                                          $67

            Daycare                                               $1,000

            Babysitting                                         $175

            Other Expenses                                   $200

                                    Total:                          $1,576

Due to the minor child’s developing needs, the parties shall review their budget for the first 12 months and then at least two times per year until age 18. At that time, they shall add additional child’s expenses as needed, and adjust their mutual contributions according to the decisions made and their respective incomes at the time.